Ep 96 – Investing in Real Estate Using Your Retirement Accounts in an Inflationary Environment | w/ John Hyre

Retirement accounts are potential hidden gold mines when it comes to investing. When you leave a job and rollover your 401k, maybe you should take a look at what you end up doing with it. Also, take a look at which IRA type is best suited for investing during an inflationary period.

Adam Schroeder talks with the Tax Reduction Lawyer John Hyre, about how investors can operate at the highest level during these times.

Learn more about John, the Tax Reduction Lawyer by CLICKING HERE


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Transcript:

Adam
Hey, you Rent To Retires, it’s Adam Schroeder here for another episode. And today we are joined by the tax reduction lawyer. That’s John Hyre. He is here and we’re going to talk about taxes but not in the way we’ve talked about him before. So John, welcome to the show.

John
Glad to be here. Thanks for having me.

Adam
Absolutely. So before we get diving into some things, tell us a little bit about yourself kind of who you are, what you do, and how you got into, you know, helping people with their real estate taxes.

John
Okay, I have been a tax attorney for 27 years, I’m also an accountant. And I’ve been an investor for about 22 years. So I started investing pretty soon out of law school, used to live in Ohio, and have real estate clients. I don’t know if in every state, for example, we may not have anybody in South Dakota, because nobody lives there. But we have real estate investor clients everywhere. So it’s something we’re very into. We’re also very much into self directed IRAs, 401, K’s that kind of thing. I now live in Puerto Rico. Without going into details. There’s a massive tax break. And I mean, massive, I’ll give you my tax bracket. Get this. It’s about 7%. 7%. I don’t pay federal income tax in Puerto Rico, I just pay Puerto Rican taxes. And to attract certain types of entrepreneurs, they give us a really sweet rate. And so it’s the benefit of both Hey, Caribbean, and also that the tax savings. So I practice what I preach, I work really hard to keep my own personal taxes down in any creative legal way that I can come up with.

Adam
Yeah, fantastic. So we were talking before we got started here, and we want to touch on some tax strategies that we haven’t discussed on the show before. And you brought up some really interesting things, especially as you know, we’ve our all of our listeners know, at this point, inflation is rampant. It’s, you know, 9.1%, I think they said lately, which was up from 8.5, which was down from 8.6, you know, that point 1%, down to eight and a half felt so good. And then it disappeared on us. And you were saying that this actually creates an environment where investing with your Roth IRA, is a much better option than your traditional, correct?

John
Yes, because the issues have the upside of a traditional IRA or 401k. As you get a deduction, when you put money into that everybody likes that tax deduction. The problem is, is when the money comes out as taxable, so a traditional account, whether it’s an IRA or 401, K is tax deferred. Now, when you’ve got inflation, you’re gonna have a lot of artificial gain. And so when that deferral comes, it’s going to be hard and ugly, where Roth, you don’t get a deduction, so you put after tax money into it, but the money comes out tax free later. Now, if you do the math on that, particularly if you have a decent return in an inflationary environment, which adds fluff to the real return, you want the Roth and there are ways to get the best of both worlds, at least partially one of my techniques is, I like to contribute to traditional accounts, I’m just going to make up a number here to make the math easy. If I put 100 grand in a traditional account, and I get $100,000 deduction, there are ways to convert that 100 grand at a discount, I won’t go into the details, because that would be a half hour on its own. But you can convert the 100 Grand, for example, at a 40% discount. And let’s think that through, I get $100,000 deduction, I do the things I have to do under tax law to only show 60,000 of income when I convert the 100 to Roth. So I got a discount on the Roth. So there are there are techniques and strategies people sometimes are very short sighted about I want the deduction today, they really need to look at what it’s going to cost them in the future, given how fast those accounts are going to inflate.

Adam
Yeah, absolutely. And one of the things that when we were discussing we mentioned, we haven’t done a whole lot of shows about self directed IRAs, solo 401, K’s those kinds of things and you made a statement to me that stuck out a lot and that is if you’re thinking about investing in real estate with your IRAs or anything like that. You say that in order to protect yourself the best thing to do is to get turnkey Can you tell people why? Having something why doing it on your own and going out and buying a property doing all of those things for it? is riskier and kind of what the pitfalls that could find are?

John
Let me make clear; that the problem with turnkey is that I lose billable hours because it’s a lot simpler and easier and safer. And so I don’t have to spend as much time with those clients. So I personally disapprove of just kidding, it’s actually whatever’s best for my clients. So, IRAs and 401, K’s that are truly self directed, not what Merrill Lynch calls self directed, which is you can buy any one of our money losing securities on Wall Street that you would like, but truly self directed, where we can put it in real estate or crypto or whatever. You have to watch out for prohibited transactions, that’s code section, 4975, prohibited section, just destroy IRAs, just destroy IRAs completely. And 401 k’s are penalized. So we want to avoid those, the easiest way to have a prohibited transaction is to be hands on, it gets a lot more complicated when you’re the one managing, for example, a rental property where you’ve got family members involved in the operations, etc. That’s where prohibited transactions for example, you’re not allowed to provide a service to your IRA. But the IRS has never defined what’s a service. So is managing your IRA rental property a service? Well, we just don’t know, IRAs, never IRS has never gone after it, which is why we don’t know. Maybe one day they will. And then they’ll define the term where if it’s turnkey, somebody else is doing everything. You really, if someone else is doing everything, you really have to work hard to have a prohibited transaction, you have to go out of your way to try and figure out how can I screw this up? So for me from from a tax safety standpoint, I like having someone else do the management in particular, the buying the selling sure, especially the management, because it just makes it so much harder to screw things up.

Adam
Now, when you say, you know, we don’t know, because they haven’t come after it. What are the risks if you are discovered that you have done a prohibited transaction with it or..

John
So, if it’s an IRA, the IRA dies, let’s say you have a million dollars in an IRA, and you lend your mother $1, which is a clear prohibited transaction, the entire Ira the million dollars is distributed taxed and penalized. It no longer grows tax free or tax deferred. That’s a pretty harsh result.

Adam
Sorry mom.

John
Yeah, yeah, “can’t lend your money mom, the lawyer said, I can’t I want to..” In a 401k. And I like 401 K’s especially if you have a small or even a micro business, and we’ll get into that in a little bit. I like solo K’s or self directed 401. K’s a lot more than IRAs, they have better rules, as we’re gonna see. One of the advantages they have is that a prohibited transaction is merely penalized in a 401k at 15% of the transaction. So I lend mom $1. It’s a 15 cent per year penalty in a 401k. So the prohibited transaction penalties and 401 k’s are lower. And it’s one of the reasons that I favor self directed 401 K’s over self directed IRAs.

Adam
Nice. And you you mentioned solo 401, k’s and self directed 401k. So let’s get into that a little bit. We were discussing during this timeframe, the recession with the pandemic and all of that, we saw the great resignation, we saw people leaving their job and floods. Some of them have actually come back into the workforce. Some of them have said now I’m good, I’m done. But for those of people who left and are now moving to a new job, they have their old, most likely their old 401k They can either do something with it or let it sit there and they can try to forget about it and hope for the best. The best thing they can do though, is to roll it over. Well, I shouldn’t say best thing because we’re not giving official advice, but of a good choice could be doing a rollover into something they can actually control. Can you tell us a little bit about how people can actually do that and what to look for whenever they are rolling it over?

John
Sure. So if you have a “job job”, the 401 K there will almost never let you invest in alternative assets like real estate, etc. So it’s not my bitcoin. Yeah, exactly which of our mutual funds would you like? None of the above, sorry. So when you leave your job, that’s easily the best time to make a rollover, and you can take your work 401k from your old job, and you can move it to an IRA. Or even better if you have a side business create a 401k whether it’s a solo K, or maybe the business doesn’t qualify for a solo K, but it still qualifies for a self directed 401k. You do that you move it into the 401k because it’s a superior account. And I gave you one reason let me give you another way I like 401k is better. When an IRA borrows, for example to buy real estate. It pays tax which means that that kind of defeats the purpose. The idea is that the growth in aside the IRA or 401 K is supposed to be tax free. But there is this tax called ubit unrelated business income tax, which is a silly name. I mean, they could just call it retirement plan tax or something but no bureaucrats. So you that creates taxation inside your retirement account. Three things cause that having an active ongoing trader business, for example, my IRA buys a law firm, that’s an active ongoing trader business, at least if they’re any good borrowing money, and renting out personal property, so sofas and furniture and automobiles and meth labs, that’s all personal property, that would create you that taxation, just to give you a very brief primer on that. So we ideally want to avoid that well, when a 401k buys real estate on leverage. So it both brings in cash and it borrows, unlike an IRA 401 K’s do not pay you bid when they borrow to acquire or improve real estate. In fact, that’s how I personally grew my 401k. I bought rental properties in my 401k. During the crash 2009 through roughly 2016 I was buying at very good prices, I bought nothing but rentals that have gone up quite a lot. Thankfully, it’s a Roth so I pay no tax on it. I borrowed from other people’s IRAs at 10%. And in my case, I borrowed 100%, because private lenders can oftentimes be very flexible. And because it was a 401 K, borrowed on this real estate 100% The deals were so good that the loans were paid off within three years in all cases, just from cash flow. I mean, we remember those deals how it was back then. And I didn’t pay any of it. And so it grew my 401k considerably. Now some people may say, well, listen, I left my job, I’m going to another job. And I don’t have a small business, I can’t have a 401k Sure, you can create a micro business, set up an eBay sales business that sells $2,000 a year, but every year, like $2,000 of stuff, or set up a consulting business where you really do consulting, not a fake consulting business where your wife or your dog is paying you money to consult with them. But you know, something legit, it doesn’t have to make a lot, the object is not to have a business that jams a bunch of money into the 401k. Though you can do that. The object is to have a micro-business that can sponsor a 401k. That is a much better vehicle than an IRA. And so when you leave your job, you roll your existing work 401 K, which is inflexible into this 401k. And if you can’t, then an IRA is better than nothing. Either way, you can self direct and invest directly in real estate. That’s the first opportunity between jobs. The second one’s a little more complicated. In 35 states. You if you have what’s called a marital reorganization, you can get a court order which usually only applies with divorce or separation. You can get a court order moving the spouses corporate 401k to the other spouse’s self directed IRA, or self directed 401 k this is known as a “QuaDRO” – qualified domestic relations order, basically the family court or divorce court issues an order saying, Listen, the wife’s she has a great job, she’s got a huge 401k At work, she’s not leaving. The court says well, wife, you got to move x percent, it could be 100% of your 401k to your husband’s self directed IRA or husband self directed 401k or vice versa. Right?

John
Normally, that only happens in a divorce or a separation, but 35 states, usually the community property states and a few others allow a third way to do this. You have a marital reorganization. What does that mean? Husband and wife agree? Here’s what we’re going to do. Maybe some of the real estate goes from wife to husband, and the 401k goes in the other direction. Maybe it just goes in one direction. Wife’s 401k at work goes to husband now what’s the risk? There’s always a catch. That’s how tax law works. There’s always a catch. And the question is, can you live with the catch? You better get along? Right? Because once you’ve got the movement, once the retirement account moves from one spouse to another, you better get along because if you don’t and you split, the spouse who got the retirement account, got the retirement account. So it is a way that if you’re not going to leave your job and you’re married and you’re comfortable with the risk of moving to the other spouse to get money out of a normal 401k at work and over to something that self directed. So a lot to unpack there. Hopefully it wasn’t too much at once.

Adam
Well, let’s go you’re talking about you know, redistributing the properties. How does that work? I mean, a lot of people hear that and they think obviously, probably going to trigger some due on sale, doing that to them. How do the mortgage companies react to you doing that? If you say, we’re gonna take these five properties that were under the wife’s name, and now they’re gonna go into the husband’s name? You know, how does that work in that environment? Is that kind of something you have to dance around? Or..?

John
I don’t definitively know. So I’m very good at taxes. Here’s my guess. And it’s a very educated guess that I can quickly confirm. If you look at the Garn Saint Germain act, I will bet you in bourbon 10 to one, that there is an exemption for transfers to spouses following a court order. Just like there are exceptions for transferring from your name into a living trust for estate planning purposes. I’ll bet your dimes $2 that there would be there would be an exception for spouses Now why would I bet? Because I have to look that up before I know for sure, I can say that. I know for sure. But I’ll betcha.

Adam
Okay. So most likely not something you have to fully concern yourself with?

John
No, I’d be shocked if it were something to concern oneself with.

Adam
Okay, fantastic. I mean, that’s definitely a waste. So that’s something that whenever it comes to, you know, you talk about setting up a micro business, if this is something like let’s keep running with the example you have wife has a W two husband has, you know, his own small business, you know, some consulting firm? Could you? Could you set it up if the husband started, as you know, a 401k, self directed for his company, and hire the wife on as an employee and tech around there. Is that a way? Or does she have to start her own business in that case?

John
So let’s talk about the goal, if the goal is to get the money out of the corporate w two plan, right? His having a business, or her having a business or her being an employee of his business, none of that will get the money out of the corporate plan. And the reason is, is the corporate plan doc will forbid that. And that’s..

Adam
..sorry, I meant she’s switching jobs, a new job, and she’s rolling her other one over.

John
Okay, so if she’s switching jobs, now she has options, do I roll to an IRA? Do I roll to a 401k? Do I have a solo? Okay. And again, that depends on some factors. For example, if she has a side business, I would just roll it into her side business and for she does a great job, but she also does a side business. And it’s just the thing she’s already been doing, oh, well, when you quit your job, just roll it into the side business, that’s the most natural, easy thing to do. If she doesn’t have a side business, now she has to make a decision, does she create a micro business before she goes to her new job, the micro business again two grand a year on eBay selling something does the micro business create a solo K, roll the money from the old work 401 K over then go get the new job. And you don’t have to do it before you get the new job, you have to do it before you roll the 401k to the new job, which is what most people automatically do they have an old job, they go get a new job, they automatically roll the 401k from the old job to the new job and have the same restrictions, the same issue that can self direct. So the opportunity is before you roll to the new job. If she already has a trade or business she rolls, if she creates a micro trader business that she’s willing every year to make about two grand, which is pretty easy to do. I don’t think that’s a whole ton of effort. I mean, a lot of people have hobbies that they can find stuff to do to generate two grand a year it’s my arbitrary number four, I’d like to see some net income for the business. If that doesn’t work, and the husband, it’s the same analysis is does the husband have an existing business? Could she be an employee of that business? No, it has to be legit. He doesn’t have to pay her much. But she has to do some work. And the salary has to be reasonable based on the work that’s being done. It can’t just be on paper where you cut the wife a W two check from the side business, but she’s not really doing anything, you just did it to get the benefit, right? Likewise, the husband could set up a micro business if it made more sense than having her do it for whatever reason, hire her as an employee where she does a fairly minor amount of stuff, but enough to generate two grand a year roll into any of those small businesses. So we gave all these options for how to have either a small business or what I would call a micro business that can sponsor a 401k usually, but not always a solo 401 K before it’s rolled into the new 401k at the new job. That’s the ideal time to do this to not be forced into the market to be able to invest in alternative assets.

Adam
So when it comes to managing you’re like how did the taxes work? Whenever you’ve got your cash flow coming in into your IRA can you can’t touch any of that can you initially aside from like if something needs to be repaired? Like you’re not Actually, this has to be properties and in money, you’re okay. Not, not having come into your everyday bank account, correct?

John
Absolutely. That’s the catch. Right? So it’s tax deferred or tax free growth, depending on whether it’s traditional or Roth. What’s the catch? You can’t touch it until you’re 59 and a half. And in the case of a Roth that has to have existed for five years, that’s commonly referred to as the seasoning role. Now, with most investors, most people who are investing money, right, because that’s what we’re talking about. They already have enough to live on. Yeah. So here’s the objection I get from a lot of them, well, I won’t do a 401 K or an IRA because I can’t touch the money. And I just, that’s unacceptable. I need to be able to touch the money. And then I look at their, what they normally do with their rentals. And what do they do? The rentals generate income and all that income goes to buying more rentals, I’m like, you’re not touching the money with what you’ve got. And then then they say, either Oh, yeah, that’s true. We might as well not touch the money and have tax free growth. Or some of them will argue, well, I want to know, I can touch the money, even if I’m not, these are the stubborn ones. I want to know that I can touch the money, even though I’m not. And I’m like, that’s fine, you can do that. But the cost is, you’re not going to be doing this tax free. And your IRA or 401 K money will be invested in something inferior, like the market?

Adam
Yeah, very, very true. They’re pretty hard to argue with that. So are you able to, you know, we talked about, you know, pre tax post tax, but when it comes to actually, you know, with when you buy a home in your own name, you can get you know, mortgage and interest write off, you can get depreciation, all of that, does that still take place? When you have it in your 401 k or IRA? Do you get any of those tax benefits?

John
Nope. You don’t, you don’t get any of the loss benefits, which again, let’s think about this. If you’re in a W two job, and you’re not a full time landlord, your rental losses are probably passive, meaning they’re hibernating on your tax return, you’re not able to use them on a current basis. So for a lot of people, it makes no difference. But there’s the marketing, no, don’t invest your 401 K money in real estate, because you don’t get the write off on the real estate. Okay, what am I supposed to do? Oh, just go invest your 401 K and bonds that pay 2% are in the market instead, because you’re not getting the write offs? Silly reasoning. So you don’t get the write offs. The 401k gets the right, well, let’s let’s be careful with our language. If an IRA borrows and is subject to that tax, you bet, it does get to use the write offs to reduce its income, like any other person to reduce that tax. So it gets depreciation, etc, etc, which often means that even when you borrow in an IRA, even though you’re technically subject to you, but if your taxes less, or your your income is less than zero every year, and let’s see negative income, no tax on a 401k. Again, borrowing on real estate doesn’t really create a ubit problem. So you’re simply not getting the write off. But your IRA or 401 K is investing in something better. And I think that’s really the point, the point is to invest in real estate. Look, I like the side benefit for normies, that real estate can generate write offs. Now we have to look at the normy the taxpayer, can you actually use that loss? Or do the passive loss rules interfere with you’re using those losses? In which case you don’t lose them? It’s just they hibernate, often for a very long time. Where with an IRA, all right, I’m not getting this extra benefit. But let’s remember why do we invest in real estate? It’s not taxes. That’s the side reason that’s reason number two, maybe what’s the number one reason income and appreciation? It’s a bet it’s a superior investment, particularly now in an inflationary environment. When do I want to borrow when the government is using inflation to pay down its debt, and mine along with it, and by the way, the Fed is going to drop rates, it’s going to happen. Why? Because the US is the largest creditor in the history of ever, they can’t sustain these pricing these these interest increases for very long. They want to fight inflation, particularly before the midterms. But once that passes, and the inflation is causing or the high interest rates are causing real damage, the popular pressure will be to reverse that move. And I do think they’re going to cave into that pressure, reduce rates which will increase inflation. Well, what do you want to have when you have rampant inflation? Debt? What do you not want to have when there’s rampant inflation paper I don’t want to sell on 30 year owner financing when there’s inflation and my financing is denominated in dollars. I want an asset that’s going up. So no, you don’t get the write offs from the IRA or the 401 K really, you’re doing this because it’s a better investment. And if you don’t think it’s a better investment. Well, good Lord, don’t do it.

Adam
Don’t do it in any fashion. But when it comes to let’s, let’s touch on kind of one of the final parts of the real estate transaction, you’ve got a home in your 401 K or your IRA, it’s been going well, for you it’s had that appreciation, it’s time to, you know, it looks like it’s time to sell and move on to other properties. How does that actively work? If you can’t do the, and it sounds like you could potentially end up with a prohibited transaction doing if you don’t if you do that incorrectly, is that the case?

John
The only way you get a prohibited transaction from selling property in an IRA or 401? K is if you sell to the wrong person, I sold the property to my mother of No, no, no, no, no, I sold the property to my 50% business partner. No, no, no, no, no, et cetera. So there’s a list of people that you’re not your IRA and your 401 K are not allowed to do business with.

Adam
If they’re in your cell phone, you probably shouldn’t sell to him.

John
I’m sorry..?

Adam
If they’re in your cell phone contact list, you probably shouldn’t sell to them?

John
That’s overbroad, or at least get my cell phone contact list. There are a ton of people in there who would not be prohibited. There are some very technical rules, certain business partners, certain employees, certain family members, anyone who provide services to the IRA, for example, if I do the tax returns for your IRA, then your IRA should not do business with me because as a service provider to your IRA, I now become a prohibited person. So there’s a discreet list, just don’t sell to those people, no problem with a prohibited transaction. By the way, what if the property in the IRA is leveraged, and if you sell it, it would cause ubit? Well, an IRA content 31, just like you and I. And that would defer the ubit taxation and give you time to pay down the debt for the subsequent sale later, if you’re gonna do a sale of the second property. So 10, IRAs, and 401. K is can 1031. And no problem selling the property as long as they don’t sell to the wrong person? So what do you do? You call someone who knows about this and find out briefly, what’s the list of people not allowed to sell to. Now look, if it’s publicly listed, and you’ve never met? The person buying? You’re fine.

Adam
Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. All right. Well, that’s, that’s really good information to hear. So you mentioned kind of talking about the marital reorganization? How difficult of a procedure is that? Like, is that a lot of paperwork? Is that something like one page that you’re right out there? Do you need to go to an attorney for it, like what all is entailed? And how difficult of a process is that, besides the fact of trusting your spouse enough to do it.

John
The it’s so it’s becoming a more common technique, right? About three or four years ago, there were probably only three or four attorneys in the country who would do it now it’s becoming known. You need an attorney who understands domestic court, aka divorce court law in that state, that’s number one. And is educated on the federal requirements for qualified domestic relations order, which more of them are getting there, it’s not that hard to do. I would say the normal cause you definitely want to have an attorney do it. This is not a DIY project, you have an attorney to it, I would say the normal cost nowadays, probably around five grand. So if you have a very large 401k, and getting it into a superior investment is worth roughly five grand, then I’d say it’s definitely worth doing. I don’t do it. I could reverse engineer it. I’ve seen these guys do it. I don’t know enough about local Family Court state by state and don’t want to know. So I do refer that sort of thing out. I know, for example, it’s legal in Texas and California, both of which are community property states, and the judges are starting to become more familiar with it as people are engaging in it.

Adam
Alright, and so last question here I have for you is, when it comes to setting up your business, you know, you’re gonna have a micro business and set it up. Is it just you need to have $2,000? And set it up? Or do you need to set it up as an S Corp? Can it be an LLC, kind of, are there any entities that are best for people as they..

John
I wouldn’t even use an entity for a micro. So let’s distinguish a small business as you happen to have a business and so great, it probably can sponsor a 401k. There are some rules, but probably, it can sponsor a 401k, maybe even a solo K, which is what we like about solo K’s versus normal 401 K’s they’re cheaper and simpler to operate. A micro business is set up simply so that you have a business, which is a requirement to have a solo K or a self directed 401k. And we’re setting it up really just for that purpose. So our goal is to have a legitimate business with the least effort possible. And that’s why I use the arbitrary number of two grand net income per year. You don’t even need an entity for that. In fact, I think it’s excessive. If I’m selling stuff on eBay, the liability Audio is so low, really? What do I want a sole proprietorship, and just a bank account that’s completely separate so that we can track what the business does. Because I’m not just a lawyer, like most lawyers would say, set up an entity, because they’re so conservative and they don’t think like entrepreneurs, but I look at cost benefit. And I’ve told clients, look, I’ll set up the LLC, if you insist on giving me money, I will set it up. I think the odds of an asset protection issue are so low with your eBay business that sells quilts or old fashioned board games, or whatever it is you do, is so low, that an entity doesn’t make any sense. I think it’s paranoid. So I wouldn’t even bother in that case with an entity. Now, if the business ends up growing, let’s say they get really good at it, and there’s real money involved. Okay, that’s different. Maybe at some point, we set up an LLC, but no, I just want a separate bank account a separate EIN number. And I want to see that two grand roughly of net income per year with some contributions, little ones a grand two grand a year to the 401k, to validate it to make it real. And again, the only reason we’re doing it is so that we can move a much larger chunk of money from another 401 k or IRA into this account. With all the benefits it has. It’s the only reason we’re doing this.

Adam
Fantastic. That’s really good stuff. Really appreciate you taking the time to join us here today. If you want to just give out any more nuggets of wisdom for our listeners, and tell them where they can go to find out more information about you, I’d really appreciate it.

John
Sure. It’s taxreductionclass.com For our content, which had been a little slow lately, you’ll see that page beefed up in the near future. Creating content, as you know takes time and effort and energy. So tax reduction, class.com and tax reduction lawyer.com for the practice, and the practice is pretty small, we take clients, but on a very small scale. I just don’t want the brain damage of too many employees. It makes me want to kill myself and others.

Adam
Well, thank you so much for joining us today, John, really appreciate it. Head on over to his websites and see what all he’s about. If he doesn’t take you on, you can at least take his class and get educated for yourself. So really appreciate you taking the time for all our listeners, you can head over to rent to retirement.com you can see our inventory. You can schedule a call with us to talk about your investing journey. That’s renttoretirement.com you can also leave us a review on whatever podcast platform you use. We would greatly appreciate it. And if you have any questions don’t forget to email them podcast@renttoretirement.com. That’s podcast@renttoretirement.com and we’ll talk to you on the next episode.

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